zoomwitch:

number-one-mollusc-fan:

snerky:

incredible

holy shit

look at this

(via loz)

hotboysofficial:

the worst part about being a Canadian child was colouring in Nunavut

image

(via sageruto)

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

(via oilyraven)

aitaikimochi:

Source: 【宗凛+百漫画】と【通販のお知らせ】by サアヤ
Translation: aitaikimochi
Notes: this is so cute and hilarious. be sure to give the artist stars if you enjoyed this! permission was granted for this comic only ^^

(via kingkitsu)

dbvictoria:

Temporary tattoos could make electronic telepathy and telekinesis possible

Temporary electronic tattoos could soon help people fly drones with only thought and talk seemingly telepathically without speech over smartphones, researchers say. Electrical engineer Todd Coleman at the University of California at San Diego is devising noninvasive means of controlling machines via the mind, techniques virtually everyone might be able to use.

Commanding machines using the brain is no longer the stuff of science fiction. In recent years, brain implants have enabled people to control robotics using only their minds, raising the prospect that one day patients could overcome disabilities using bionic limbs or mechanical exoskeletons.

But brain implants are invasive technologies, probably of use only to people in medical need of them. Instead, Coleman and his team are developing wireless flexible electronics one can apply on the forehead just like temporary tattoos to read brain activity.

"We want something we can use in the coffee shop to have fun," Coleman says.

The devices are less than 100 microns thick, the average diameter of a human hair. They consist of circuitry embedded in a layer or rubbery polyester that allow them to stretch, bend and wrinkle. They are barely visible when placed on skin, making them easy to conceal from others.

The devices can detect electrical signals linked with brain waves, and incorporate solar cells for power and antennas that allow them to communicate wirelessly or receive energy. Other elements can be added as well, like thermal sensors to monitor skin temperature and light detectors to analyze blood oxygen levels.

Using the electronic tattoos, Coleman and his colleagues have found they can detect brain signals reflective of mental states, such as recognition of familiar images. One application they are now pursuing is monitoring premature babies to detect the onset of seizures that can lead to epilepsy or brain development problems. The devices are now being commercialized for use as consumer, digital health, medical device, and industrial and defense products by startup MC10 in Cambridge, Mass.

READ MORE

(via sageruto)

adriofthedead:

morganperreault:

the only way I’ll wake up early

japanese prank shows are on a whole other level

adriofthedead:

morganperreault:

the only way I’ll wake up early

japanese prank shows are on a whole other level

(via witty-name-goes-here)

peaceroxi:

"hold on wait i have to take a photo of this bara shark for my friend"

peaceroxi:

"hold on wait i have to take a photo of this bara shark for my friend"

(via xyle)

freshest-tittymilk:

portraits-of-america:

     “I got both of them from local shelters. When I got her in 2006, the staff told me she was a shepherd husky. I go to the dog park, I’m meeting people with shepherd husky mixes, and they look nothing like her. I get in my car, I’m driving, I look in the rearview mirror, I see these eyes and I’m like, I’ve got a wolf in my car. Then, when she was 10-months old, there was a shepherd breeder and trainer in the dog park, and at the end of the lesson, the trainer came up to me and asked, ‘What kind of dog is that?’ And I’m thinking, Shepherd husky. You should know, you are a breeder. She said, ‘That’s a wolf.’”  
Bethlehem, PA
 

Thats mildly hilarious

freshest-tittymilk:

portraits-of-america:

     “I got both of them from local shelters. When I got her in 2006, the staff told me she was a shepherd husky. I go to the dog park, I’m meeting people with shepherd husky mixes, and they look nothing like her. I get in my car, I’m driving, I look in the rearview mirror, I see these eyes and I’m like, I’ve got a wolf in my car. Then, when she was 10-months old, there was a shepherd breeder and trainer in the dog park, and at the end of the lesson, the trainer came up to me and asked, ‘What kind of dog is that?’ And I’m thinking, Shepherd husky. You should know, you are a breeder. She said, ‘That’s a wolf.’” 

Bethlehem, PA

 

Thats mildly hilarious

(via xyle)

archiemcphee:

These awesome illuminated inflatable white rabbits are the work of Australian artist Amanda Parer for an installation entitled Intrude. In May 2014 the giant glowing bunnies were installed at the Vivid Festival of Light Sydney and next month they’ll be part of the Junction Arts Festival in Launceston, Tasmania.

Parer’s enormous and radiant rabbits, which stand 7 meters (~23 feet) tall, were created as a twofold response to the animals’ common occurrence in Australian fairytales as well as their invasive presence throughout Australia:

"These animals first travelled to Australia on the ships of the First Fleet and were brought ashore in cages in January 1788. These adaptable creatures quickly made themselves at home and eventually spread to almost every corner of the land. An Australian contradiction, Intrude represents the fairy-tale animals of our childhood – a furry innocence, frolicking through idyllic fields, while revealing their more serious and large-scale effect on the environment.”

Click here for additional images.

[via Lost At E Minor]

(via satire-shortcake)

qrieves:

Someone probably took a bite out a bar of soap for this aesthetic so let’s take a moment to thank

qrieves:

Someone probably took a bite out a bar of soap for this aesthetic so let’s take a moment to thank

(via satire-shortcake)